In the defense of dogs !

“When you give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn’t work out. Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!”

    – President of the USA – Donald Trump

The face of the generation is like the face of a dog

The Talmud in both Sotah and Sanhedrin says that in the times leading up to the Messiah’s arrival, the generation’s face will be like that of a dog. The (real) rabbis explain that when one walks a dog, the dog seems to run ahead, but constantly turns around to make sure that the ‘master’ is following. So is the dog leading the ‘master’ or is the ‘master’ leading the dog? In reality, the ‘master’ is leading the dog, even though the dog gives the illusion that the opposite is the case. The dog symbolizes the Jewish communal leadership; the ‘master’ symbolizes the Jewish public at large.

I wonder if even the rabbis envisioned a situation where the dog would do a better job of leading.

“Every dog has its day”-An Arabic saying

The first White House dog to receive regular newspaper coverage was Warren G. Harding‘s dog Laddie Boy.[2]

Pets also featured on presidential elections. Herbert Hoover got a Belgian shepherd dog, King Tut, during his campaign and pictures of him with his new dog were sent all across the United States.

In 1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt was running for his fourth term when rumors surfaced that his Scottish Terrier, Fala, had accidentally been left behind when visiting the Aleutian Islands. After allegedly sending back ships to rescue his dog, Roosevelt was ridiculed and accused of spending thousands of taxpayers’ dollars to retrieve his dog. At a speech following this Roosevelt said, “you can criticize me, my wife and my family, but you can’t criticize my little dog. He’s Scotch and all these allegations about spending all this money have just made his little soul furious.”[3] What was later called the “Fala Speech” reportedly helped secure re-election for Roosevelt.[4]

Miss Beazley, a Scottish Terriergiven to Laura Bush by her husband

Richard Nixon was accused of hiding a secret slush fund during his candidacy for vice president under Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952. He gave the televised “Checkers speech” named after his cocker spaniel, denying he had a slush fund but admitting, “there is one thing that I did get as a gift that I’m not going to give back.”[5] The gift was a black-and-white cocker spaniel, Checkers, given to his daughters. Although there had been talk of Nixon being dropped from the ticket, following his speech he received an increase in support and Mamie Eisenhower reportedly recommended he stay because he was “such a warm person.”[6][7]

Animal lovers were upset when President Lyndon B. Johnson was photographed picking his two Beagle dogs named Him and Her up by their ears. Others did not understand the uproar; former President Harry S. Truman said, “What the hell are the critics complaining about; that’s how you handle hounds.”[5]

List of Presidential pets[edit]

President Pet(s)
George Washington
John Adams
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
  • Polly – Parrot, outlived both James And Dolley Madison[17]
James Monroe
John Quincy Adams
Andrew Jackson
Martin Van Buren
  • Briefly owned two tiger cubs given to him by the Sultan of Oman before Congress forced him to donate the tigers to the zoo[27][28]
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
James K. Polk
Zachary Taylor
Millard Fillmore
Franklin Pierce
James Buchanan
Abraham Lincoln

Old Bob caparisoned in a mourning blanket at Abraham Lincoln’s funeral

Andrew Johnson
Ulysses S. Grant
Rutherford B. Hayes
James A. Garfield
Chester A. Arthur
Grover Cleveland
Benjamin Harrison
Whiskers pulling a cart at the White House, with Russell Harrison and his children
Dash in front of his doghouse
  • Whiskers (“His Whiskers,” or “Old Whiskers”) – Goat,[16][39] kept at the White House for the president’s grandchildren; may have belonged to Russell Harrison[40]
  • Dash – Collie[12]
  • Mr. Reciprocity and Mr. Protection – Opossums,[41] named from the 1896 Republican party platform,[42] which includes: “Protection and reciprocity are twin measures of Republican policy and go hand in hand.”[43]
William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt

Archie riding Algonquin

Roosevelt family with Skip

Illustration of Slippers, the White House cat[nb 4]

William Howard Taft
  • Caruso – Dog,[ps 2] a gift for Taft’s daughter Helen from opera singer Enrico Caruso; after a White House performance, he decided that cows were not appropriate pets for a little girl[54]
  • Mooly Wooly and Pauline Wayne – Cows[ps 2]
Woodrow Wilson
Warren G. Harding

Laddie Boy

Calvin Coolidge

Portrait of Rob Roy and Grace Coolidge

Herbert Hoover

Herbert Hoover with King Tut

Franklin D. Roosevelt

FDR and Fala (1940)

Harry S. Truman
Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • Gabby – parakeet[67]
  • Heidi – weimaraner[68]
John F. Kennedy

Kennedy family and dogs

Lyndon B. Johnson

LBJ with Him

Richard Nixon

King Timahoe, Vicki and Pasha looking out the window in the White House

Gerald Ford
Susan Ford & Shan the Siamese cat
Susan Ford, daughter of Gerald Ford, and the family’s siamese cat, Shan, in 1974
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Reagan family pet spaniel, Rex
Rex
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
George H. W. Bush

Millie

Bill Clinton

Socks

George W. Bush

India

Barack Obama

Bo and Sunny

Donald Trump
  1. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Number unknown

The first White House dog to receive regular newspaper coverage was Warren G. Harding‘s dog Laddie Boy.[2]

Pets also featured on presidential elections. Herbert Hoover got a Belgian shepherd dog, King Tut, during his campaign and pictures of him with his new dog were sent all across the United States.

In 1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt was running for his fourth term when rumors surfaced that his Scottish Terrier, Fala, had accidentally been left behind when visiting the Aleutian Islands. After allegedly sending back ships to rescue his dog, Roosevelt was ridiculed and accused of spending thousands of taxpayers’ dollars to retrieve his dog. At a speech following this Roosevelt said, “you can criticize me, my wife and my family, but you can’t criticize my little dog. He’s Scotch and all these allegations about spending all this money have just made his little soul furious.”[3] What was later called the “Fala Speech” reportedly helped secure re-election for Roosevelt.[4]

Miss Beazley, a Scottish Terriergiven to Laura Bush by her husband

Richard Nixon was accused of hiding a secret slush fund during his candidacy for vice president under Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952. He gave the televised “Checkers speech” named after his cocker spaniel, denying he had a slush fund but admitting, “there is one thing that I did get as a gift that I’m not going to give back.”[5] The gift was a black-and-white cocker spaniel, Checkers, given to his daughters. Although there had been talk of Nixon being dropped from the ticket, following his speech he received an increase in support and Mamie Eisenhower reportedly recommended he stay because he was “such a warm person.”[6][7]

Animal lovers were upset when President Lyndon B. Johnson was photographed picking his two Beagle dogs named Him and Her up by their ears. Others did not understand the uproar; former President Harry S. Truman said, “What the hell are the critics complaining about; that’s how you handle hounds.”[5]

List of Presidential pets[edit]

President Pet(s)
George Washington
John Adams
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
  • Polly – Parrot, outlived both James And Dolley Madison[17]
James Monroe
John Quincy Adams
Andrew Jackson
Martin Van Buren
  • Briefly owned two tiger cubs given to him by the Sultan of Oman before Congress forced him to donate the tigers to the zoo[27][28]
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
James K. Polk
Zachary Taylor
Millard Fillmore
Franklin Pierce
James Buchanan
Abraham Lincoln

Old Bob caparisoned in a mourning blanket at Abraham Lincoln’s funeral

Andrew Johnson
Ulysses S. Grant
Rutherford B. Hayes
James A. Garfield
Chester A. Arthur
Grover Cleveland
Benjamin Harrison
Whiskers pulling a cart at the White House, with Russell Harrison and his children
Dash in front of his doghouse
  • Whiskers (“His Whiskers,” or “Old Whiskers”) – Goat,[16][39] kept at the White House for the president’s grandchildren; may have belonged to Russell Harrison[40]
  • Dash – Collie[12]
  • Mr. Reciprocity and Mr. Protection – Opossums,[41] named from the 1896 Republican party platform,[42] which includes: “Protection and reciprocity are twin measures of Republican policy and go hand in hand.”[43]
William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt

Archie riding Algonquin

Roosevelt family with Skip

Illustration of Slippers, the White House cat[nb 4]

William Howard Taft
  • Caruso – Dog,[ps 2] a gift for Taft’s daughter Helen from opera singer Enrico Caruso; after a White House performance, he decided that cows were not appropriate pets for a little girl[54]
  • Mooly Wooly and Pauline Wayne – Cows[ps 2]
Woodrow Wilson
Warren G. Harding

Laddie Boy

Calvin Coolidge

Portrait of Rob Roy and Grace Coolidge

Herbert Hoover

Herbert Hoover with King Tut

Franklin D. Roosevelt

FDR and Fala (1940)

Harry S. Truman
Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • Gabby – parakeet[67]
  • Heidi – weimaraner[68]
John F. Kennedy

Kennedy family and dogs

Lyndon B. Johnson

LBJ with Him

Richard Nixon

King Timahoe, Vicki and Pasha looking out the window in the White House

Gerald Ford
Susan Ford & Shan the Siamese cat
Susan Ford, daughter of Gerald Ford, and the family’s siamese cat, Shan, in 1974
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Reagan family pet spaniel, Rex
Rex
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
George H. W. Bush

Millie

Bill Clinton

Socks

George W. Bush

India

Barack Obama

Bo and Sunny

Donald Trump
  1. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Number unknown

The first White House dog to receive regular newspaper coverage was Warren G. Harding‘s dog Laddie Boy.[2]

Pets also featured on presidential elections. Herbert Hoover got a Belgian shepherd dog, King Tut, during his campaign and pictures of him with his new dog were sent all across the United States.

In 1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt was running for his fourth term when rumors surfaced that his Scottish Terrier, Fala, had accidentally been left behind when visiting the Aleutian Islands. After allegedly sending back ships to rescue his dog, Roosevelt was ridiculed and accused of spending thousands of taxpayers’ dollars to retrieve his dog. At a speech following this Roosevelt said, “you can criticize me, my wife and my family, but you can’t criticize my little dog. He’s Scotch and all these allegations about spending all this money have just made his little soul furious.”[3] What was later called the “Fala Speech” reportedly helped secure re-election for Roosevelt.[4]

Miss Beazley, a Scottish Terriergiven to Laura Bush by her husband

Richard Nixon was accused of hiding a secret slush fund during his candidacy for vice president under Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952. He gave the televised “Checkers speech” named after his cocker spaniel, denying he had a slush fund but admitting, “there is one thing that I did get as a gift that I’m not going to give back.”[5] The gift was a black-and-white cocker spaniel, Checkers, given to his daughters. Although there had been talk of Nixon being dropped from the ticket, following his speech he received an increase in support and Mamie Eisenhower reportedly recommended he stay because he was “such a warm person.”[6][7]

Animal lovers were upset when President Lyndon B. Johnson was photographed picking his two Beagle dogs named Him and Her up by their ears. Others did not understand the uproar; former President Harry S. Truman said, “What the hell are the critics complaining about; that’s how you handle hounds.”[5]

List of Presidential pets[edit]

President Pet(s)
George Washington
John Adams
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
  • Polly – Parrot, outlived both James And Dolley Madison[17]
James Monroe
John Quincy Adams
Andrew Jackson
Martin Van Buren
  • Briefly owned two tiger cubs given to him by the Sultan of Oman before Congress forced him to donate the tigers to the zoo[27][28]
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
James K. Polk
Zachary Taylor
Millard Fillmore
Franklin Pierce
James Buchanan
Abraham Lincoln

Old Bob caparisoned in a mourning blanket at Abraham Lincoln’s funeral

Andrew Johnson
Ulysses S. Grant
Rutherford B. Hayes
James A. Garfield
Chester A. Arthur
Grover Cleveland
Benjamin Harrison
Whiskers pulling a cart at the White House, with Russell Harrison and his children
Dash in front of his doghouse
  • Whiskers (“His Whiskers,” or “Old Whiskers”) – Goat,[16][39] kept at the White House for the president’s grandchildren; may have belonged to Russell Harrison[40]
  • Dash – Collie[12]
  • Mr. Reciprocity and Mr. Protection – Opossums,[41] named from the 1896 Republican party platform,[42] which includes: “Protection and reciprocity are twin measures of Republican policy and go hand in hand.”[43]
William McKinley
Theodore Roosevelt

Archie riding Algonquin

Roosevelt family with Skip

Illustration of Slippers, the White House cat[nb 4]

William Howard Taft
  • Caruso – Dog,[ps 2] a gift for Taft’s daughter Helen from opera singer Enrico Caruso; after a White House performance, he decided that cows were not appropriate pets for a little girl[54]
  • Mooly Wooly and Pauline Wayne – Cows[ps 2]
Woodrow Wilson
Warren G. Harding

Laddie Boy

Calvin Coolidge

Portrait of Rob Roy and Grace Coolidge

Herbert Hoover

Herbert Hoover with King Tut

Franklin D. Roosevelt

FDR and Fala (1940)

Harry S. Truman
Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • Gabby – parakeet[67]
  • Heidi – weimaraner[68]
John F. Kennedy

Kennedy family and dogs

Lyndon B. Johnson

LBJ with Him

Richard Nixon

King Timahoe, Vicki and Pasha looking out the window in the White House

Gerald Ford
Susan Ford & Shan the Siamese cat
Susan Ford, daughter of Gerald Ford, and the family’s siamese cat, Shan, in 1974
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Ford and Liberty in the Oval Office
Jimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Reagan family pet spaniel, Rex
Rex
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
Ronald Reagan on El Alamein
George H. W. Bush

Millie

Bill Clinton

Socks

George W. Bush

India

Barack Obama

Bo and Sunny

Donald Trump
  1. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Number unknown

 

Today there was an article about wild dogs, claiming there are millions of wild dogs who roam in packs in India and in Israel there are a couple of thousands and that they pose a threat to wild life.

It seems to me that the person writing the article had an agenda to demonize the dogs , the writer claims that humane solutions such as catching the dogs and spaying them are not possible because there are too many dogs..i wonder..

The wildlife in Israel being threatened as far as i know is more under threat from man  made industry and construction that destroys their habitat than wild dogs. 

There is a  particular balance in nature and once that is destroyed , then there is a price to pay but i have a difficult time believing that wild dogs are the major threat to wild life.

“A new type of wild animal is running rampant in Israel, causing enormous damage to nature, while the authorities do nothing to counter the problem, charge researchers and nature protection personnel.

They say that packs of feral dogs that have no fear of humans are attacking gazelles as well as livestock.

“You see packs of dogs, sometimes 10 at time, looking for prey,” an Israel Nature and Parks Authority ranger, who asked that his name not be used, said. “The ones that pay the price are the gazelles. You can see these packs embark on real chases after the gazelles,” he added.

Amitzur Buldo, a recently-retired parks authority ranger, still takes to the field where he says he says he sees for himself and hears from friends about the actions of the dogs. “This is a dog that lives in the wild, preys in the wild and reproduces in the wild.” Buldo says some of these dogs also mate with wolves. Buldo, who was a ranger for 30 years, says he is tired of hearing them referred to as “stray dogs” when they are in fact “wild dogs.”

There is no record of how many such dogs there are, he says, but the damage they cause is enormous because, unlike wolves, they are not afraid of humans. That is why they strike herds of domesticated animals, and not only wild ones, he explains.

This was an article from 2012 but in 2018 this article appeared

There are 33,000 stray dogs in Israel, 60 percent of which are in the southern part of the country, according to the first survey of its kind to be conducted locally by Humane Society International, last year.

The global animal-protection organization is involved, among other activities, in neutering and vaccinating strays and returning them to the locations where they are picked up. The survey was conducted on behalf of Let the Animals Live Israel, an NGO that believes that HSI’s approach is a compassionate alternative to the widespread shooting and killing of these animals. Advocates of approach claim that sterilization and inoculation make it possible to exert tighter control over the population of strays. Moreover, studies have shown that such measures also rein in rabies more effectively than killing the dogs.

>> Archaeology of dogs: Were they first domesticated in the Middle East?

The survey is the first step in a nationwide plan by HSI, the international arm of the Humane Society of the United States, to actively address the problem of stray dogs in Israel. The results show that there are some 19,860 stray dogs in the south of the country, mostly in the vicinity of the Negev Bedouin communities that have been established without government authorization. There are slightly more than 10,000 of them in the north, mostly near smaller locales. Surveyors found that there were relatively small populations of the dogs in the Jerusalem and Tel Aviv areas.

The editors of the HSI project, Rahul Sehgal and Amit Chaudhari, acknowledged that their ability to carry out the study and to accurately analyze the situation in the south was limited by the fact that some of the communities there are unrecognized, and they noted that the actual number of strays is likely to be even higher in those areas.

HSI intends to carry out additional research in these locations, where it is clear that a particularly intensive effort will be required to deal with the stray dog problem, according to organization officials.

“We have taken responsibility [for an issue] that should have been the province of the Agriculture Ministry,” said Yael Arkin, director of Let the Animals Live Israel. “From here on in, it is the responsibility of the government and the Agriculture Ministry in particular to adopt the report’s findings, especially its recommendations. Solutions such as the indiscriminate shooting of dogs, as is carried out periodically in Israel, have proved ineffective and have even resulted in an increase in the number of strays.”

During last year’s visit by HSI, the Agriculture Ministry stated that it opposes the organization’s approach of releasing stray dogs after they have been captured and treated.

For its part, the Israel Nature and Parks Authority said it is unaware of any country in which the HSI approach has been successful in reducing dog populations.

 

“They work like wolves, in a pack. If they spot a young gazelle, it’s done for,” Buldo says.

Gazelles, which already have many other natural enemies, don’t need an additional one he says, noting that there are two kinds of gazelles that are found only in Israel. Buldo believes that feral dogs are also responsible for the decline in the roe deer population on the Menashe Plateau south of Mount Carmel on Mount Horshan in the Carmel foothills.

Wild dogs near Moshav Elkosh in the Galilee.
Wild dogs near Moshav Elkosh in the Galilee.Yaron Kaminsky

 

 

About seagullsea

a seagull flying over the great ocean of life observing.
This entry was posted in all about dogs, dog tails, Uncategorized, wild animal rescue and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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